Home

Why was the Voting Rights Act of 1965 necessary select all that apply

Why was the voting rights act of 1965 necessary? Select

  1. Why was the voting rights act of 1965 necessary? Select all that apply a. Each citizen must be ruled by the same laws. b. Each citizen must be able to participate in government. c. Each citizen must have the protections of the bill of rights. d. Each citizen must have equal voting power in federal elections. e
  2. atory actions were taking place. African Americans weren't slaves anymore, but they were still getting treated lke it
  3. Why was the Voting Rights Act of 1965 necessary? Answer Each citizen must be able to participate in government. AND Each citizen must have equal voting power in federal elections. 2
  4. ation
  5. ority voting rights by the highest courts and lawmakers across the country. In 2006, Congress voted to re-authorize the VRA, extending its authority for the fourth time since its enactment
  6. The Voting Rights Act of 1965, signed into law by President Lyndon B. Johnson, aimed to overcome legal barriers at the state and local levels that prevented African Americans from exercising their..
  7. ation in voting. It was signed into law by President Lyndon B. Johnson during the height of the civil rights movement on August 6, 1965, and Congress later amended the Act five times to expand its protections

Why did Congress determine that the Voting Rights Act of 1965 was necessary? Choose all that apply. Congress determined that the existing federal anti-discrimination laws were not sufficient to overcome the resistance by state officials to enforcement of the 15th Amendment Read the excerpt from an article written by President Barack Obama, reflecting on the Voting Rights Act of 1965. On August 6, 1965, President Lyndon Johnson signed the Voting Rights Act into law—breaking down legal barriers at the state and local level that had prevented African Americans and others from exercising their constitutional right to vote.Because of that law—one of our nation's. The Voting Rights Act of 1965 provided direct federal enforcement to remove literacy tests and other devices that had been used to disenfranchise African Americans. It also prevented states from changing voter requirements and gerrymandering districts for a period of five years without federal review The Voting Rights Act of 1965 banned voter discrimination.. Answer: Option B. Explanation: The act which was passed in the year of 1965 in regards with voting rights which were held by the people, made some changes in the rights which were enjoyed by the people to elect the officials decided to end the discrimination which the voters had to suffer especially in the areas of states in the south.

National Archives (NARA) On August 6, 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson passed the Voting Rights Act. The Voting Rights Act of 1965 expanded the 14th and 15th amendments by banning racial discrimination in voting practices. The act was a response to the barriers that prevented African Americans from voting for nearly a century The Voting Rights Act of 1965 removed barriers to black enfranchisement in the South, banning poll taxes, literacy tests, and other measures that effectively prevented African Americans from voting. Segregationists attempted to prevent the implementation of federal civil rights legislation at the local level. The Civil Rights Act of 196 The Voting Rights Act at 50: How It Changed the World. I t was only eight days after President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Voting Rights Act on Aug. 6 of 1965 that federal voting examiners.

Why was the Voting Rights Act of 1965 necessary? - Brainly

1. Why was the Voting Rights Act of 1965 necessary? Answer ..

  1. ated the poll tax, and the Voting Rights Act of 1965, which ended Jim Crow laws. Women were denied the right to vote until 1920, when the long efforts of the women's suffrage movement resulted in the 19th Amendment
  2. orities a chance to elect a candidate of their choice. There are two important provisions. Section 2 applies nationally, and Section 5 applies only to certain covered jurisdictions which are located primarily in the South
  3. ation at the polls: President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the resulting legislation into law on Aug. 6, 1965

Background. Congress adopted the Voting Rights Act in 1965 to end discriminatory practices by state and local governments that limited voting rights based on race or color.. Subsection 4(b) of the act specified that any state or political subdivision was subject to the preclearance requirement in Section 5 if: (1) the Attorney General determines that it maintained on November 1, 1964, any. Yesterday was the 50th anniversary of the Voting Rights Act, which has been both sword and shield for racial equity and inclusive democracy. And yet today, the right to vote for millions of Americans is in more danger than at any time since the passage of the law, thanks to the Supreme Court decision two years ago that struck down the most important part of the law and cleared the way for. The Voting Rights Act (VRA) was passed in 1965 to ensure that state and local governments do not deny American citizens the equal right to vote based on their race, color, or membership in a minority language group. This momentous piece of legislation enshrines the right of every citizen an equal opportunity to participate in our democracy Congress enacted major amendments to the Voting Rights Act of 1965 in 1970, 1975, 1982, 1992, and 2006. Each of these amendments coincided with an impending expiration of some of the Act's special provisions, which originally were set to expire by 1970. However, in recognition of the voting discrimination that continued despite the Act, Congress repeatedly amended the Act to reauthorize the. This would continue until the 24 th Amendment in 1964, which eliminated the poll tax, and the Voting Rights Act of 1965, which ended Jim Crow laws. Women were denied the right to vote until 1920, when the long efforts of the women's suffrage movement resulted in the 19 th Amendment

A A. The Voting Rights Act of 1965 was historic for its removal of many voting barriers that African-Americans and other minorities had faced for years in the U.S. It came on the heels of Bloody Sunday, in which a peaceful protest march in Selma, Alabama, ended with the attack by state troopers on the largely African-American crowd The Voting Rights Act of 1965. WATCH: Voting Rights Act of 1965. Signed into law 95 years after the 15 th Amendment was ratified into the Constitution,.

The Voting Rights Act of 1965. To amend the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE. This Act may be cited as the `Fannie Lou Hamer, Rosa Parks, and Coretta Scott King Voting Rights Act Reauthorization and Amendments Act of 2006' Why was the voting rights act of 1965 necessary? Select all that apply a. Each citizen must be ruled by the same laws.b. Each citizen must be able to participate in government.c. Each citizen must have the protections of the bill of rights. d. Each citizen must have equal voting power in federal elections.e The Voting Rights Act of 1965 was designed to protect the voting rights of disenfranchised citizens, particularly African-Americans in the South, as outlined in the 15th Amendment The Effect of the Voting Rights Act; The Voting Rights Act of 1965 The 1965 Enactment. By 1965 concerted efforts to break the grip of state disfranchisement had been under way for some time, but had achieved only modest success overall and in some areas had proved almost entirely ineffectual. The murder of voting-rights activists in. WASHINGTON, D.C. — Why is voting important? Through the work of five amendments to the constitution and the Voting Rights Act of 1965, Americans have been fighting for the right to vote to be written into our laws. The 14th amendment gives all persons with U.S. citizenship rights and privileges, including the right to vote

President Lyndon Johnson signed the Voting Rights Act in 1965. This act is generally considered to mark the end of the Jim Crow Era. However, many vestiges of Jim Crow remain in our laws and customs. African Americans line up to vote after the passage of the 1965 Voting Rights Act. Voter suppression laws have again been put into place over the. The Voting Rights Act of 1965 was a Success! - East Hampton, NY - On August 6,1965 an act to enforce the 15th Amendment to the Constitution was signed into law. No matter what our color, race. These struggles have kept the United States as an independent nation and granted us the right to vote with the passage of the 15 th, 19 th, 24 th, and 26 th amendment, in addition to the legislative victory of the Voting Rights Act of 1965. From this perspective, it is a privilege to live in the United States, standing on the shoulders of these. President Lyndon B. Johnson's Great Society was a sweeping set of social domestic policy programs initiated by President Lyndon B. Johnson during 1964 and 1965 focusing mainly on eliminating racial injustice and ending poverty in the United States. The term Great Society was first used by President Johnson in a speech at Ohio University. Johnson later revealed more details of the. In the hardest voting rights struggle, Black Americans, whose right to vote was recognized in the 15th Amendment to the US Constitution, continued to face official and unofficial restrictions and suppression in Southern states and cities until the Voting Rights Act of 1965 established strong federal protections for the freedom to vote by.

Holder (2013), the Court held that a section of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 that subjected certain states and counties to heightened antidiscrimination measures is unconstitutional, as is exceeds the scope of Congress's powers and is an impermissible intrusion on state sovereignty. The Voting Rights Act of 1965 is a landmark civil rights law This act prohibited racial discrimination in voting and allowed everyone to vote. It was an extremely important event in the civil rights movement. Selma to Montgomery Civil Rights March sign commemorating the famous civil rights march led by Martin Luther King, Jr. over 50 years ago

Congress and the Voting Rights Act of 1965 National Archive

Voting rights are a fraught issue this year during the 2020 presidential election. Since the US Supreme Court struck down a key section of the 1965 Voting Rights Act in the 2013 Shelby County v.Holder decision, many states have passed laws that create barriers to voting, by limiting the types of ID voters can use, disenfranchising felons, restricting early and absentee voting, and removing. Overview The Voting Rights Act (VRA), codified at 42 U.S.C. §§ 1973 to 1973aa-6, is an important federal civil rights law that protects minorities from discriminatory voting practices.Initially, the VRA only protected racial minorities, but in 1975, Congress extended its protections to members of languages minorities, including voters who speak Spanish, Native American languages. On March 15, 1965, President Johnson called upon Congress to create the Voting Rights Act of 1965. He said, In our system the first and most vital of all our rights is the right to vote. Jefferson described it as 'the ark of our safety.' It is from the exercise of this right that all our other rights flow. Enlarge President Lyndon Johnson's Speech to Congress on Voting Rights It would take the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 before the majority of African Americans in the South were registered to vote. 15th Amendment to the United State Constitution From the Statutes at Large, A Century of Lawmaking for a New Nation: U.S. Congressional Documents and Debates, 1774 - 1875 Lyndon Johnson signs the Voting Rights Act with Martin Luther King Jr. and other civil rights activists standing by, on August 6, 1965. LBJ Presidential Library. The 19th Amendment did not guarantee that all women and men in the United States could vote. Securing this essential right has been an long struggle, that for some, continues on to.

The Snyder Act of 1924 admitted Native Americans born in the U.S. to full U.S. citizenship. Though the Fifteenth Amendment, passed in 1870, granted all U.S. citizens the right to vote regardless of race, it wasn't until the Snyder Act that Native Americans could enjoy the rights granted by this amendment Here's Why Some States Waited Decades. American suffragists hold a jubilee celebrating their victory following the passing of the 19th Amendment in August 1920. W hen Tennessee ratified the 19th. Holder, the U.S. Supreme Court struck down the central pillar of the 1965 Voting Rights Act, enacted to preserve the American ideal and constitutional right of a fair and free vote for all citizens irrespective of race or any other characteristic. This pillar, fundamentally Sections 4 and 5 of the Act, requires certain states, counties and.

Why The Voting Rights Act Matters American Civil

In March 1965, thousands of people held a series of marches in the U.S. state of Alabama in an effort to get that right back. Their march from Selma to Montgomery, the capital, was a success, leading to the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965. African Americans first earned their right to vote in 1870, just five years after the United. On June 25, 2013, the United States Supreme Court held that it is unconstitutional to use the coverage formula in Section 4(b) of the Voting Rights Act to determine which jurisdictions are subject to the preclearance requirement of Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act, Shelby County v. Holder, 133 S. Ct. 2612 (2013). The Supreme Court did not. The Voting Rights Act of 1965 is one of the most successful pieces of legislation in our history, says Aden, but the fight to uphold its protections continue today, especially following the 2013. Introduction. Widely lauded as one of the most effective statutes ever enacted, the Voting Rights Act of 1965 (VRA) finally made good on the promise of the Fifteenth Amendment. 1 1 See, e.g., Charles S. Bullock III & Ronald Keith Gaddie, The Triumph of Voting Rights in the South 323 (2009) (The consensus is that the [VRA] has been inordinately successful.) That is why voting reform is a pillar of the For the People Act. And of course, it's not just this bill. The John Lewis Voting Rights Act, which is a critical companion to the For the People Act, would restore the full sweep of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 and undo the damage of the Supreme Court's Shelby County decision

Voting Rights Act of 1965 - Definition, Summary

Voting Rights Act of 1965 - Enacted to address Jim Crow laws in the Deep South and other barriers minorities faced when trying to participate in elections; key provisions of the Act were removed by the Supreme Court in 2013 The Selma Campaign is considered a major success for the Civil Rights Movement, largely because it was an immediate catalyst for the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Signed into law by President Lyndon B. Johnson on Aug. 6, 1965, the Voting Rights Act guaranteed active federal protection of Southern African Americans' right to vote August 6, 2018 marks the 53 rd anniversary of President Lyndon B. Johnson signing into law the Voting Rights Act (VRA) of 1965. Politicians and organizations alike are recognizing the milestone on social media, highlighting how the VRA continues to influence American elections and politics today

Reflections of the 1965 Freedom March from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama by Susan Jans-Thomas An account of the commemoration of the defining event of the American Civil Rights Movement in the 1960's. It tells the story of how race relations in America have progressed since the 1950's and 60's. Dr. Jans-Thomas revisits an important location in the Civil Rights movement and walks through various. The last time a President sent a civil rights bill to the Congress it contained a provision to protect voting rights in Federal elections. That civil rights bill was passed after 8 long months of debate. And when that bill came to my desk from the Congress for my signature, the heart of the voting provision had been eliminated Introduction. In June 2013 the U.S. Supreme Court struck down section 4 of the 1965 Voting Rights Act (Shelby County v.Holder, 133 S. Ct. 2612 [2013]).Also known as the statistical trigger, section 4 was arguably the single greatest contributor to black enfranchisement over the last half century because it legislated a statistical formula automatically establishing liability for former. Voting Rights Act of 1965. President Lyndon B. Johnson introduced the Voting Rights Act to Congress in March 1965, the same month that voter registration protests began in Selma, Alabama. The violence there added pressure on Congress to act, and the bill passed in four months. The law outlawed literacy tests, poll taxes, and other obstacles to.

Black women still fight to vote after 1920. Despite the successes of the suffrage movement, obstacles remained even after 1920, says Jones, who was named after activist Ida B. Wells. When we look back at the 19th Amendment, even though it passed on paper, African American women were not allowed to exercise that freely, she says Over the years, we've all received those cryptic messages that the Voting Rights Act of 1965, one of the most important pieces of legislation from the Civil Rights era, was in danger. Welp. Welp The Voting Rights Act of 1965. The Voting Rights Act of 1965 prohibited literacy tests as a barrier to voting; empowered the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) and federal courts to monitor problem jurisdictions; and, most importantly, required jurisdictions with a history of discrimination to receive federal approval before they could make any changes in voting procedures or requirements The Help America Vote Act was passed in 2002 to replace punch card and lever-based voting systems after 2 million votes were deemed ineligible for registered multiple or no choices when they were. The movement also uprooted many of the practices that prevented blacks from voting. The Voting Rights Act of 1965 suspended literacy tests and similar easily abused devices in states and counties-the so-called covered jurisdictions-where racial disenfranchisement had been most pervasive and entrenched

Voting Rights Act of 1965 - Wikipedi

The Civil Rights Movement and getting the Voting Rights Act passed in 1965 was, again, a long struggle. That's the main message of a new series of six webinars, Every Voice Counts, developed by the Tsongas Industrial History Center (TIHC) to educate teachers about the fight for voting rights and equitable representation for all. Yes it is the right time. No it will not happen. Right now it is accepted as an article of faith on the left that the right is interested now and in the future on voter suppression. People on the right believe that the most recent election was rif.. Martin Luther King, Jr. - Martin Luther King, Jr. - Challenges of the final years: The first signs of opposition to King's tactics from within the civil rights movement surfaced during the March 1965 demonstrations in Selma, Alabama, which were aimed at dramatizing the need for a federal voting-rights law that would provide legal support for the enfranchisement of African Americans in the South

In this vastly important read, White Rage author Carol Anderson unpacks how the 2013 Supreme Court decision to roll back the Voting Rights Act of 1965 led to a storm of government-led racial discrimination and voter suppression One Person, No Vote: How Voter Suppression Is Destroying Our Democracy - Kindle edition by Anderson, Carol, Durbin, Dick, Durbin, Dick. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading One Person, No Vote: How Voter Suppression Is Destroying Our Democracy The Voting Rights Act of 1965 helped finish the job, removing barriers for disenfranchised African Americans to vote. In 2020, Utah State University launched its Year of the Woman campaign to celebrate important suffrage milestones. As the country prepares for the general election in November, we asked four Aggie women why voting matters to them

CPP194 Quizzes Flashcards Quizle

one part historical primer and one part spirited manifesto[One Person, No Vote] seems to have been written from a state of emergency, in an adrenaline-fueled sprint.Anderson is a stinging polemicist; her book rolls through a condensed history of voting rights and disenfranchisement, without getting bogged down in legislative minutiae Why was the voting rights act of 1965 necessary? select all that apply a. each citizen must be ruled by the same laws. b. each citizen must be able to participate in government. c. each citizen must have the protections of the bill of rights. d. each citizen must have equal voting power in federal elections. e How the U.S. Voting Rights Act was won—and why it's under fire today In 1965, this historic civil rights law prohibited discrimination against Black voters. Though it has since been gutted. The Voting Rights Act of 1965 is regarded by many civil rights activists and analysts as the most important policy achievement in the struggle to 'kill Jim Crow.' Write an essay in which you explain why voting rights was an important, even primary, goal

Voting Rights Act of 1965 Facts for kids. Voting Rights Act of 1965 Facts - 1: H istory: The 15th Amendment to the Constitution was passed in 1870 stating that a citizen's right to vote cannot be taken away because of race, the color of their skin. It initially achieved its purpose and black voting participation and representation in the Southern states increased rapidly A A. The Voting Rights Act of 1965 attempted to end discrimination at the polls. Written into the act were several sections, or provisions. One of the most controversial and debated aspects involves the preclearance stipulations of sections 4 and 5. The term preclearance in this case refers to, Advance approval by a federal court or.

Civil Rights and Voting Rights Flashcards Quizle

Finally, after numerous demonstrations were held by activists -- some ending in violence -- President Johnson signed the Voting Rights Act into law in 1965. The Voting Rights Act banned literacy tests, provided for federal oversight of election laws, and authorized the Attorney General to investigate discriminatory voting practices Act of February 28, 1925, 43 Stat. 1070, 2 U.S.C. §§ 241-256. Comprehensive regulation is now provided by the Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971, 86 Stat. 3, and the Federal Election Campaign Act Amendments of 1974, 88 Stat. 1263, as amended, 90 Stat. 475, found in titles 2, 5, 18, and 26 of the U.S. Code. See Buckley v The United States has a troubled history of voter suppression. Prior to the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, many states used policies such as poll taxes and literacy tests to prevent. Why Democrats And Republicans Disagree About Voting Rights The two parties differ in the basic ways they perceive and frame myriad aspects of practicing democracy, especially when it comes to voting That is the main reason why Congress needs to re-craft and reinstate Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, which requires that voting laws receive preclearance from the U.S. Attorney General before going into effect. Texas' Voter ID law is one such law that it took awhile for the courts to eventually rule unconstitutional

Why were voting rights so important to the civil rights

Prior to the Voter Rights Act of 1965, these were some of the more commonly used tactics by conservatives who wanted to keep blacks from voting. SEE ALSO: Why Newt Scares Me Violence In 1873, a. The 15th amendment passed in 1870 granted voting rights to citizens regardless of race or color. The 19th Amendment finally gave women the right to vote. Fifty years later, the right to vote was granted to all citizens who were 18 and older. Lastly, the voting rights act of 1965 demolished many voting barriers, such as literacy tests 1965 The federal Voting Rights Act suspends literacy tests. Registration and voting rights are now federally enforced. 2008 After a lengthy U.S. Supreme Court battle, Washington enacts the Top 2 Primary that allows voters to choose any candidate regardless of party preference Select Country Why Voting, And The Voting Rights Act, Should Matter To Changemakers. August 9, 2013 Why Voting, And The Voting Rights Act, Should Matter To Changemakers. Partager Why Voting, And The Voting Rights Act, Should Matter To Changemakers. August 9, 2013.

The National Voting Rights Act was passed in 1993 which made it easier for all Americans to register, vote, and maintain their registration. Until June 2013, voting laws and practices were under close scrutiny by the US Justice Department because in Southern states and elsewhere voters experienced restrictive policies. The Shelby County v 1965. The Voting Rights Act protects the rights of minority voters and eliminates voting barriers such as the literacy test. The Act is expanded and renewed in 1970, 1975, and 1982. 1966. The Supreme Court, in Harper v. Virginia Board of Elections, eliminates the poll tax as a qualification for voting in any election On the other hand, civil rights campaigners felt that much more needed to be done, especially in terms of housing and voting rights. Voting Rights Act 1965 Causes See Office of the Historian, U.S. House of Representatives, Documentary: Selma and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. For an overview and analysis of the legal and social effects of the act, see William D. Araiza, Voting Rights Act of 1965, in Major Acts of Congress, vol. 3: 271-278. 111 Thurber, The Second Reconstruction: 543

What did the Voting Rights Act of 1965 accomplish?It

The Voting Rights Act of 1965 expanded Asian-American voting rights even further by adding protections and accommodations for voters with limited English, such as access to translators and ballots. An Extension of the Fight for Civil Rights. Just as the 1924 legislation was a reflection of what John Higham called the tribal twenties, 6 the 1965 legislation was a signature moment of the 1960s. A year earlier Congress had passed the Civil Rights Act, barring discrimination on grounds of race, color, religion, sex, or national origin

Voting Rights Act of 1965 (U

While it's not a comprehensive as the For The People Act which outright prohibits most voter suppression tactics and eliminates gerrymandering, the John Lewis Act restores key provisions of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 requiring that states with a history of racial voting discrimination get pre-clearance from the Justice Department before. Elections and Voting. One of the most important rights of American citizens is the franchise—the right to vote. Originally under the Constitution, only white male citizens over the age of 21. Lillian's Right to Vote: A Celebration of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 by Jonah Winter and Shane W. Evans While the 15th Amendment gave African American men the right to vote in 1870 and the 19th Amendment gave women of all races the right to vote in 1920, in reality, systemic racism in voting practices and state law prohibited many African. Why Voting—and Voter Suppression—Matter. September 30, 2020. By Boreta Singleton, Mercy Associate and member of the Institute Office of Anti-Racism and Racial Equity Collaborating Committee. In this centennial year of the passage of the 19 th Amendment, which granted women in the United States the right to vote, we often hear stories of suffrage movement leaders Elizabeth Cady Stanton or.

Why were some people were opposed to women voting? Learn the definition of civil disobedience and research examples. Learn who represents you in the United States Congress and how to contact them to express your opinion on an issue important to you. Learn about the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965 Indigenous people must apply for citizenship. The Voting Rights Act of 1965 and subsequent laws passed in 1970, 1975 and 1982 built stronger voting protections to allow Native Americans to vote without intimidation, literacy tests, poll taxes and fraud. 196 On March 15, 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson addressed Congress asking for their support to pass the Voting Right Act of 1965. This legislation — until recently — provided clear, uniform. Who started the voting rights? It was signed into law by President Lyndon B. Johnson during the height of the civil rights movement on August 6, 1965, and Congress later amended the Act five times to expand its protections. Who led the Voting Rights Act of 1965? This act was signed into law on August 6, 1965, by President Lyndon Johnson While Wilson argued voter ID was a common sense solution that would not discriminate, he also focused on why the Voting Rights Act of 1965 - which requires laws pertaining to voting in South Carolina and seven other states be cleared by the justice.

Martin Luther King, Jr. (born Michael King, Jr.; January 15, 1929 - April 4, 1968) was an American pastor, activist, humanitarian, and leader in the Civil Rights Movement.He was best known for improving civil rights by using nonviolent civil disobedience, based on his Christian beliefs. Because he was both a Ph.D. and a pastor, King is sometimes called the Reverend Doctor Martin Luther King. Following Reconstruction, they would be denied their legal right to vote in many states until the Voting Rights Act of 1965. But all of this was yet to come. The Americans of 1865 were standing at. Amazon.com: Why Voting Is Important?! Hello Select your address All Hello, Sign in. Account & Lists Account Returns & Orders. Cart All. Best Sellers Prime Customer Service New Releases Find a Gift Whole Foods Today's Deals Books Gift Cards. August 6, 1965 The Voting Rights Act of 1965 was signed into law. The Section 5 provision requiring pre-clearance of voting policy changes in Southern states was renewed in 1970, 1975, 1982, 2006, until the Supreme Court decision in 2013 Much of this was covered on national television and focused the country's attention on civil rights issues for the first time. Public outrage helped spur the U.S. Congress to pass the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Freedom Summer is a term invented after these events occurred The visibility that SCLC brought to the civil rights struggle laid the groundwork for passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. By the latter half of the decade, tensions were growing between SCLC and more militant protest groups such as SNCC and the Congress of Racial Equality